Eye Exam Frequently Asked Questions

FAQs for Eye Health and Eye Exams Page

How much is an eye exam?

Eye exam prices vary greatly depending on your chosen vision care provider and location. Call you local Visionworks store to find out their eye exam pricing.

To find your local Visionworks, click here.

Does my insurance plan cover eye exams?

Most vision insurance plans provide for one to two comprehensive eye examinations a year. If you do not have vision insurance, Visionworks offers special discounts for those without insurance.

To find out what promotions and discounts are offered at your local store, click here.

How often should you get an eye exam?

Current guidelines for eye exam frequency vary depending on factors such as age and overall health of each patient. Some may require an annual exam while others may need them more or less frequently. A good rule of thumb is for those over age 40, it is recommended to see your eye doctor once a year.

To schedule your eye exam appointment at your local Visionworks, click here.

What to expect at an eye exam?

  1. Dilation

    Your eye doctor will dilate your eyes with dilating drops to make your pupils larger during a comprehensive eye exam. This allows them a better view of the internal structure of your eye. When your pupils are dilated you will be more sensitive to light and may find it hard to focus on objects up close. Bring sunglasses to your exam to help reduce glare and light sensitivity after you leave.

    To schedule your eye exam appointment at your local Visionworks, click here.

  2. Diabetes/Hypertension

    As your body ages, so do your eyes. Patients 65 and older are more susceptible to cataracts than the general population. A cataract is a clouding of the lens inside the eye, leading to a decrease in vision. Over time, the transparent lens changes to a yellow or brownish color, causing problems with the crispness of vision and managing glare. The best way to diagnose cataracts is with an annual eye health evaluation. If you are diagnosed with cataracts, your eye doctor will discuss its effects on your vision and possibly recommend surgery.

    To schedule your eye exam appointment at your local Visionworks, click here.

  3. Special needs (cataracts, MD, women’s health)

    1. A diabetic eye exam is no different than a regular eye exam, though if you have diabetes it is even more important to get regular eye exams. Diabetes mellitus, commonly shortened to diabetes, is the leading cause of blindness in American adults. This group of diseases is caused by high blood glucose due to a defect in the body’s ability to use or produce needed insulin. Diabetics can suffer a loss of vision due to changes in the blood vessels of the retina. Through an eye examination, your eye doctor can diagnose retinal changes that can indicate the progression of the disease.

      To schedule your eye exam appointment at your local Visionworks, click here.

    2. Age-related macular degeneration, commonly shortened to macular degeneration, is one of the leading causes of vision loss among those age 60 and up. Macular degeneration affects the central area of the retina known as the macula. Cells within the macula can malfunction over time and may cease to work, causing vision loss. The number one preventative measure for macular degeneration is a yearly visit to your eye doctor.

      To schedule your eye exam appointment at your local Visionworks, click here.

    3. Some eye diseases have a higher incidence in women versus men, which is directly related to hormone changes that occur during a woman’s lifetime. Some common problems are reduced tear production during pregnancy or later in life, age-related macular degeneration due to a woman’s longer life span in comparison to men, and complications with the eye related to the use of eye makeup. A yearly visit to your eye doctor is the best way for women to maintain the health of their eyes.

      To schedule your eye exam appointment at your local Visionworks, click here.

  4. Contact lens exam

    Those who wear or want to wear contact lenses need a contact lens exam in addition to a standard eye exam. Special tests, such as a measure of the eye surface and an evaluation of your tear production are necessary to prescribe the best contacts for each individual. Whether you choose glasses or contacts, it’s important to receive a yearly eye exam to maintain vision and overall wellness.

    To schedule your eye exam appointment at your local Visionworks, click here.

How to read an eye exam prescription

  1. What do “OD” and “OS” mean in eye exam?

    “OD” and “OS” are abbreviations for oculus dexter and oculus sinister, which are Latin terms for the right and left eye. You may also see the abbreviation OU on your prescription. This stands for oculus uterque, which means “both eyes.” Some doctors and clinics might use the more modern terms “RE” and “LE,” meaning “right eye” and “left eye.”

  2. How long are eye exam prescriptions good for?

    Eyeglass prescriptions typically expire after two years, though some circumstances require a shorter expiration. Contact lenses usually expire after one year.